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Museum Publishes New Book on RCA Studio B

Aug 01, 2016

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum announces the publication of Home of 1,000 Hits: Nashville’s Historic RCA Studio B. The first major treatment focusing on this Music City landmark, the book provides an insightful overview of Nashville’s rich history as a major recording center. Throughout, artists, producers, engineers, studio musicians, and label executives tell fascinating stories about some of American music’s greatest artists, including Dolly Parton, Elvis Presley, Jim Reeves, and dozens more. Presley cut more than two hundred sides in this magical space, including songs for movie soundtracks, and three albums of critically acclaimed gospel material. 

Although performers on RCA’s country roster used the studio most often, many had crossover success in the pop market with recordings that perfected a country-pop blend called the Nashville Sound. By helping to increase the number of full-time country radio stations, the Nashville Sound provided a solid foundation for country’s ongoing popularity. RCA pop acts also recorded at Studio B, turning out hits such as Ann-Margret’s “I Just Don’t Understand” and Al Hirt’s “Java.” Rosemary Clooney and Perry Como used the facility as well.

From its beginning in the fall of 1957 to its closing in 1977, artists on other labels recorded at Studio B. For instance, the Everly Brothers cut their first Studio B session in November 1957, soon after the operation opened for business. Roy Orbison—first on Monument and then on MGM—recorded a string of international hits in this storied space, including “Only the Lonely,” “Running Scared,” and “Blue Angel.” “Honey,” Bobby Goldsboro’s biggest hit, was also recorded here.

Album covers, news stories, vocal charts, and rare photographs illustrate the studio’s twenty-year contribution to the Nashville music industry and its impact in the U.S. and abroad.

Home of a Thousand Hits may be purchased in the Museum Store, or online.

—John Rumble

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